Tag Archives: Pierce Brosnan

Weekend Preview: “Frances,” “Maisie,” and “Love” Finally Make it to the Buff

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I’m not sure why there has suddenly been a cluster of TIFF 2012 movies opening in Buffalo, but I’m not complaining. This week sees three interesting films for adults that emerged from the Toronto International Film Festival with varying degrees of buzz: “Frances Ha,” “Love is All You Need,” and “What Maisie Knew.”

The biggie is surely Noah Baumbach’s swoon-worthy “Frances Ha,” a wonderful film that I wrote about today on buffalospree.com. I’ll likely be posting that piece and more thoughts on the film here very soon. Suffice to say, I adored it, and Great Gerwig’s performance in it. I’m not sure I’ll ever hear Bowie’s “Modern Love” again without thinking of her twirling through the air. This one is highly recommended.

Susanne Bier is a fascinating filmmaker, but I’m not sure I’ve figured her out yet. She directed the stunning “Brothers” (the original) and “After the Wedding,” featuring one of Mads Mikkelsen’s finest performances). But her English-language debut, “Things We Lost in the Fire,” while a gallant effort, fell flat. So, too, did her Academy Award-winning “In a Better World,” a marginal work that somehow defeated Haneke’s “White Ribbon” for the Best Foreign Language Oscar.

“Love is All You Need” looks like a rather dopey adult romantic comedy, but the presence of Bier and stars Pierce Brosnan (who has grown more interesting with age) and “Better World’s Trine Dyrholm, along with the lovely Italian scenery, make it moderately alluring. Reviews have been very mixed; as Stephen Holden put it in the New York Times, “The first sign of trouble in the romantic comedy ‘Love Is All You Need’ is the clichéd and incessant use of ‘That’s Amore.’”

The pint-sized star of “What Maisie Knew” is adorable — her visage truly sells the poster — but the movie, a present-day Henry James adaptation, does not sound appealing. The first line of the film’s description fills me with dread: “Susanna (Julianne Moore) is a pushy but seductive rock and roll icon married to Beale (Steve Coogan), a charming, distracted art dealer.” Oh boy. Yet the cast is a draw; Moore, Coogan, Alexander Skarsgard. And directors Scott McGehee and David Siegel have done interesting work together (“The Deep End,” “Uncertainty”). I would expect this one to close quickly, so if interested, act fast.

Of course, these are just the wee indies. In the multiplexes, the big openings are the Vince Vaughan-Owen Wilson Google-promotion/comedy “The Internship,” and Ethan Hawke in the horror-home invasion thriller “The Purge.” Get this: Box office buzz indicates that “The Purge” may top “The Internship.” That would be a huge blow for Wilson and Vaughan; there seems to be little enthusiasm for the film, and perhaps the Onion has hit on why with this headline: “‘The Internship’ Poised to be Biggest Comedy of 2005.”

It actually seems as if “Internship” won’t even hit the number two or three spot, with the still-going-strong “Fast & Furious 6” and the surprise hit “Now You See Me” coming ahead of it. If Shawn Levy’s comedy is topped by “After Earth” in its second week, we’ll officially have a disaster on our hands …

One other option, of course, is to stay in and watch Shane Carruth’s “Upstream Color” on Netflix. Yep, this mind-blower is now streaming.

As I previously mentioned, coming this Friday and Saturday at the Screening Room in Amherst: “Sorry, Wrong Number” at 7:30 followed by “What’s Up, Tiger Lily?” at 9:15.

And as the Buffalo News reports today, the North Park Theater is no more — at least, for a little while. It’s a shame, truly, but it is fitting that the final film to play there under Dipson was Buffalo product Peter McGennis’s “Queen City.” Let’s hope the theater does, indeed, reopen soon.

Next week sees Superman return in “Man of Steel” while Seth Rogen and friends face the apocalypse in “This is the End.” What’s the best news for Buffalo movie fans? Richard Linklater’s “Before Midnight” arrives.
Photo: Doane Gregory/Sony Pictures Classics