A “Fresh” Hubbard Film Society screening

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Back in July, I discussed East Aurora’s Hubbard Film Society, a group whose goal, as stated on the HFS website, “is to provide high quality art and foreign films followed by insightful discussion on a monthly basis. The Society currently presents a film the second Sunday of every month.”

Next up, on Sunday, October 20 (which is actually the third Sunday of the month), is a screening of the documentary “Fresh,” described like so:

“[The film] celebrates the farmers, thinkers and business people across America who are re-inventing our food system. Each has witnessed the rapid transformation of our agriculture into an industrial model, and confronted the consequences: food contamination, environmental pollution, depletion of natural resources, and morbid obesity. Forging healthier, sustainable alternatives, they offer a practical vision for a future of our food and our planet.”

Many of my friends and colleagues will be especially interested in this one, and the discussion that will follow. There are so many of these unique screening groups locally, and the HFS is surely one of the most ambitious.

The film will be presented at the Parkdale Elementary School, 141 Girard Avenue in East Aurora. (A new location.) Tickets are $6 for members, $8 for nonmembers. For questions, or to book a group, call 655-0420 or write to bradleys@buffalo.edu.

The Hubbard Film Society: Watching and Talking About Cinema in East Aurora

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I first became aware of the Hubbard Film Society in East Aurora when I worked at Buffalo Spree, but I since forgot about this group formed by the Roycroft Campus Corporation and Aurora Art Films. The goal, as stated on the HFS website, “is to provide high quality art and foreign films followed by insightful discussion on a monthly basis. The Society currently presents a film the second Sunday of every month.”

The group’s next film is a few weeks away: 2012’s French-language hit “Intouchables,” which will be screened at 4 p.m. on Sunday, July 14. I must admit, I was not a lover of this film — in fact, I found it quite overrated — although Omar Sy was marvelous, there were moments of fine comedy, and it was certainly an above-average piece of entertainment. It should generate some discussion, and it is the kind of film that tends to emotionally involve its audience. (It did not for me, but again, it is a worthy film.)

Note that all screenings are held at the Roycroft Power House, 37 South Grove Street, across from the Roycroft Inn. Tickets are reasonable: $6 for members, $8 for nonmembers. For questions, or to book a group, call 655-0420 or write to bradleys@buffalo.edu.

I especially love that they plan the schedule so early. August 11 brings the dark documentary “The Flat”; the Dardenne Brothers’ great “The Kid With the Bike” screens on September 8; and the year closes out with “Fresh,” “Seraphine,” and “Chicken with Plums,” respectively.

What is especially nice about the series that it offers a chance to see films that may never have played Buffalo. Yes, many are streaming on Netflix and Amazon, but it’s nice to talk about them afterwards, right?

Incidentally, the list of previous films on the site is fantastic. A sampling: “Raise the Red Lantern,” “The Skin I Live In” (blast from the past: my 2011 Buffalo News review of Almodovar’s film), “A Separation” (another blast from the past: my 2012 Buffalo News review of the Oscar winner), “Certified Copy,” “The Trip” (one final blast from the past: my 2010 Buffalo News review of the Steve Coogan-starrer), “The Lives of Others,” “The Decalogue 2, “Potiche,” “Bill Cunningham New York.”

Great films, and a very cool program for Western New Yorkers.

Photo: Anne Le as Yvonne, Francois Cluzet as Philippe and Omar Sy as Driss in THE INTOUCHABLES Photographer: Thierry Valletoux Copyright: © 2011 Gaumont — Quad.