Brian DePalma’s fascinating ‘Phantom’

phantom-of-the-paradise

Here is a recent Buffalo News Gusto post that takes a look at one of filmdom’s most interesting filmmakers, albeit one whose resume veers wildly between “great” and “awful”: Brian DePalma.

Brian De Palma became a successful director right along with fellow “movie brats” Steven Spielberg, George Lucas and Martin Scorsese, but he has certainly had the most up and down career of that foursome. Spielberg is the world’s most famous filmmaker, Lucas can buy and sell small countries, and Scorsese is seen by many as America’s greatest living director.

De Palma, on the other hand, still struggles. Yes, “Scarface” is iconic, “Carrie” still scares, “The Untouchables” and “Mission: Impossible” were hits, and films like “Blow Out” and “Carlito’s Way” are now given their just due. But then there are the mighty flops — “Wise Guys,” “The Bonfire of the Vanities,” “The Black Dahlia,” 2012’s awful “Passion.”

One of his weirdest and most fascinating films, 1974’s musical “Phantom of the Paradise,” is showing at 7 p.m. Oct. 14 and 9:15 p.m. Oct. 17 at in the Screening Room Cinema Cafe (3131 Sheridan Drive, Amherst) to commemorate its 40th anniversary. Whether one is a De Palma obsessive or a newbie, it’s a cult classic that still entertains.

“Paradise” is a loose adaptation of “The Phantom of the Opera” with a killer lead performance from William Finley and memorable songs by co-star Paul Williams. Seeing the incomparable Williams serves as a reminder to check out the moving documentary “Paul Williams: Still Alive,” which is available for rental on iTunes and Amazon

As the documentary details, the film proved enormously popular in Winnipeg, of all places, even inspiring two “Phantompaloozas” that reunited the cast. Go figure.

The Oct. 17 Screening Room presentation of “Phantom of the Paradise” will be preceded by Mel Brook’s “Young Frankenstein,” also showing Oct. 18, 21, 23 and 24.

For more info, visit www.screeningroomboutiquecinemas.com.