‘20,000 Days on Earth’ might be the year’s most unique documentary — and perhaps its best, too

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While it is unlikely to land an Academy Award nomination — it’s far too hip and groundbreaking for that — I’m not sure there will be a more unique, exhilarating, entertaining documentary this year than Nick Cave’s “20,000 Days on Earth.”

Of course, Cave is not the director of “20,000” days; British documentarians Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard are the filmmaking team responsible. But calling it Cave’s film seems appropriate, since his voice, visage, and mind dominate every moment.

Not quite a biography, not really a concert film, although there are elements of both, “20,000 Days on Earth” is something altogether fresh. For a little over 90 minutes, we spend one day with the iconic singer-songwriter as he drives around, works on his next album (eventually released as Push the Sky Away), talks about his life, chats with Ray Winstone and Kylie Minogue, and discusses his approach to life and art.

Perhaps that does not sound altogether fascinating. But it most certainly is, even for just a minor Cave fan. (I’ve always been intrigued and enjoy much of his music, but until watching this film I never quite considered myself a Cave fanatic. Now, I’m happy to.) There are not many performers who could make such a project feel so invigorating, but Cave can. He’s that cool.

Drafthouse Films opens “20,000 Days on Earth” nationwide on September 17, but Buffalonians have an opportunity to see it at Squeaky Wheel on October 22. This is a 4-star film, and a must-see. For more info on the Squeaky screening, visit http://www.squeaky.org/events/2014/fall/20000-days-on-earth-nick-cave. And for the trailer and details on the film, visit www.drafthousefilms.com.